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Your Diet Has A Direct Impact On Your Emotions




Have you ever eaten a meal that left you feeling tired, irritable, and even depressed?

Why is it that we recognize how a child’s behavior can be negatively influenced by a poor diet, but we fail to realize how it affects us, too?


A growing number of psychiatrists and mental health professionals are practicing what’s called “nutritional psychiatry”, and they’re studying the connection between food and mood.


Besides the usual questions doctors ask their patients, they’re starting to inquire about what they typically eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks.



Some believe that conditions like depression, anxiety, and other mental illness conditions could be greatly improved with the right diet.


Studies are showing that the brain thrives on nutrient-rich foods which improve cognitive function. Nutritional psychiatrist, Dr. Drew Ramsey says, “Our highly processed Western diet is not giving the brain what it most craves to work at its best”.


Many doctors have had great success with patients that have made healthy diet and lifestyle changes. Some were even able to lower their prescription medications or eliminate them altogether.


You may wonder how diet and mood are connected. Eating a highly-processed diet with refined sugars and high-fat foods leads to inflammation which interferes with proper brain function causing more stress and more inflammation.


On the other hand, a diet rich in vitamins and minerals from fruits, vegetables, grains, and high-quality proteins helps reduce inflammation.

Foods like leafy greens, kale, and spinach are loaded with nutrients like magnesium. Berries, avocados, fatty fish like salmon and tuna, and nuts are all great anti-inflammatory foods.





The gut and brain are connected and what you eat does matter. When you eat a wide variety of nutritious foods along with living an active healthy lifestyle, you’re better able to handle occasional stress and negative influences.


Living a healthier life also helps you to maintain a healthy weight, have more energy, and more easily face challenges that come your way.


According to Dr. Ramsey, “A more resilient brain can start with your next meal”.

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